Monthly Archives: December 2012

Little Drummer Boys

My great-grandfather, Archie, enlisted in the 12th Regiment of the US Infantry at Forth Hamilton, facing New York’s harbor from Brooklyn,  on January 27, 1862. He soon met three young Union soldiers arrayed in their military regalia.

Fort Hamilton Trio

Drummers and buglers were vitally important to train new recruits in drills they would need to use in action one day. Drum tattoos and bugle calls initiated everything from charges to retreats, rallying troops in the din of warfare. Though still young boys, these three were already veterans of battle at Bull Run.

Remember The Forsaken

This is Thomas Corbett. He was known by his fellow Union soldiers as “Boston.” Boston served directly with my great-grandfather, Archie, in the NY 12th Infantry and the NY 16th Cavalry. After the Civil War, Boston Corbett became one of the most renowned people in the USA. Over time, his fame faded, he dropped from public view, and his reputation was sullied by much speculation. Archie’s view of what really happened to his sergeant and friend  will be revealed in my book.Thomas "Boston" Corbett

Do you know this warrior?

A few years before this photo was taken, this man served in the NY 16th Cavalry, alongside my great-grandfather, Archibald Van Orden. Fate brought them together to endure the same dangers as they fought the enemy in war. Do you recognize him?

Young GW jr.

In peace, destiny drove this man to patent the invention he envisioned when he was a prisoner of war in 1864. Do you recognize what this drawing shows?

1865 Patent Drawing

Later, this man became a key protagonist in the “battle of currents” with Thomas Edison. Edison backed Direct Current. This man backed Alternating Current. AC went on to predominance as the electricity that we use at home today.

As time progressed, his company grew into a 20th century manufacturing power, and continues even into our 21st century lives.

Salute of Arms

On April 9 – 12, 1865, Archibald Van Orden wore this ribbon on his uniform, signifying his position in an honor guard accompanying General Grant at ceremonies of surrender on the grounds of Appomattox Court House, Virginia.

Worn by Archibald Van Orden, 16th NY Cavalry, at Appomattox, VA, surrender of CSA to USA.

Worn by Archibald Van Orden, 16th NY Cavalry, at Appomattox, VA.

On April 9, General Lee surrendered his Army of Northern Virginia. On April 10, the CSA cavalry surrendered. On April 11, the CSA artillery surrendered. On April 12, the CSA infantry surrendered. At this final occasion, Joshua Chamberlain ordered the US Army to salute the CS Army with a command of “Order Arms; Carry!” The surrendering forces returned this action of mercy with their own Marching Salute. By honor saluting honor, the two armies began the healing of repatriation.

The painting below depicts cavalry to cavalry surrender on April 10, 1865:

CSA Cavalry surrenders to USA Cavalry.

CSA Cavalry surrenders to USA Cavalry.

Portrait of The Soldier As a Young Child

This tintype depicts Archie circa 1853 when his family lived in New York City, prior to moving to “the country” in Westchester County not long afterwards.  Archie’s not-quite-smiling young face reveals the clearly carved, yet smooth, features that would define his dutch ancestry for the rest of his long life.

Tintype Circa 1853

Tintype Circa 1853

Well Regulated Militia

The Second Amendment to the United States Constitution, part of our Bill of Rights, states: “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

For defense of their family, for hunting game for their table, and in preparation for protecting their country, Archie Van Orden’s father, Abraham, gave his son the gift of a Springfield rifle to mark the occasion of his 15th birthday.

Springfield_Model_1855_Knickerbocker

The Sister So Close To Archie’s Heart

Archie Van Orden carried this photograph of his younger sister, Martina, in his breast pocket, throughout the civil war. She was a reminder of the home and family for which he he was fighting to restore the Union. Her image was constant solace during war and wounds, watching over him in battles and imprisonment.

Martina Van Orden 1862

The Spoon Mightier Than The Sword

In 1864, Archie Van Orden crafted a crude spoon together using nothing but tin scraps and ingenuity. The story of how this spoon kept him alive when thousands of others perished in the most desperate conditions will be revealed in my book.

Until then, Archie’s own words (written to his family) suffice to tell of its import: “Though a miserable excuse for a spoon, I would not trade it for a silver service.”

AVO Tin Spoon

GAR Veteran Archibald Stark Van Orden

Until his final day on this earth in 1917, my great-grandfather was proud to have served his nation at its hour of greatest need in the Grand Army of the Republic.

This is the last photo ever taken of Archie, on Armistice Day, 1917. In his 70’s, he still stood straight, head held high with the bearing of a warrior who withstood withering warfare at its worst.

AVO on Armistice Day

When Wall Street Was A Wall

The great-great-great-grandfather of Archibald Van Orden was named Pieter Casparszen VanNaerden. (Translated into English his name means Peter the son of Caspar from Naerden.) Pieter was the first Dutch ancestor of our family who sailed to the new world, arriving at Nieuw Amsterdam in 1623. By the time of Pieter’s death in 1664, the city known today as New York looked like this, with  a stout wall on its north end to ward off attacks from native peoples:

 

 

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